Telling the stories of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives

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The contribution of Indigenous nurses and midwives to Australian healthcare is being recognised and celebrated with a bid to tell more of their stories.

HESTA has committed to record and celebrate the stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in Australia as part of their Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), which aims to shine a light on the history of Indigenous nurses and midwives.

HESTA CEO, Debby Blakey said they were looking forward to working with the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) to help showcase the contributions Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have made to the Australian healthcare system.

“By collaborating with associations like CATSINaM to record and share their stories we hope to help acknowledge the barriers they may have overcome, whilst raising awareness of the pivotal role they continue to play in achieving health equality in Australia,” Ms Blakey said.

HESTA has also committed to supporting the development of Indigenous nurse leaders in the health care sector.

“We’re proud to promote initiatives and programs that support future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander leaders within the health sector. We recognise the vital role these future health professionals play in achieving health equality between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the wider Australian community,” Ms Blakey said.

CATSINaM CEO, Janine Mohamed said the collaboration between HESTA and CATSINaM was important to help tell the stories of Indigenous nurses and midwives from their own perspective and highlight their contribution to health equity.

“It’s really important for our Indigenous nurses and midwives to see their predecessors’ contributions to their professions. We hear so much about Florence Nightingale and non-Indigenous nurses. It’s vital that both Indigenous and non-Indigenous nurses know the beautiful rich history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives in this country.

“Their stories need to be elevated so that we can know and have pride in them,” Ms Mohamed said.

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